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CONN-OSHA Quarterly

Volume No. 30
Summer 2002
 

Fire Brigades: An Overview
Jeff Saltus, Occupational Safety Compliance Officer

A fire brigade is an organized group of employees who are knowledgeable, trained, and skilled in at least basic fire fighting operations.

Each town/municipality that decides to maintain a fire department has to prepare a written statement or policy establishing the existence of a fire brigade. This statement must include the organizational structure of the department, the type, amount, and frequency of training to be provided to department members, the expected number of members in the department, and the functions that the members are expected to perform.

Fire department personnel who are expected to do interior structural fire fighting must be physically capable of performing duties which may be assigned to them during emergencies. No employee with known heart disease, epilepsy, or emphysema may participate in fire brigade emergency activities unless a physician's certificate is provided stating the employee's fitness to participate in such activities.

The fire brigade standard is a performance standard, which means you need only train fire fighting personnel on those duties and functions that the members are expected to perform. Such training and education has to be provided to members before they perform fire brigade emergency activities. Fire department officers and training instructors shall be provided with training and education which is more comprehensive than that provided to the general membership of the department. All fire brigade members have to be provided with training at least annually on those elements/functions the members are expected to perform.

In addition, fire department members who are expected to perform interior structural fire fighting shall be provided with an education session or training at least quarterly. The following subjects are examples of key elements:

1. Safety and Protective Equipment

2. Chemistry of Fire and Behavior

3. Self Contained Breathing Apparatus

4. Fire Streams

5. Hose

6. Pumping Fire Apparatus

7. Ladders

8. Rescue

9. Forcible Entry

10.Ventilation

The department shall maintain and inspect, at least annually, fire fighting equipment (i.e. ladders, hoses, pumpers, aerials) to assure the safe operational condition of the equipment. Portable fire extinguishers and respirators must be inspected at least monthly. Fire fighting equipment that is in damaged or unserviceable condition must be removed from service and replaced and/or repaired.

The department members need to be provided with protective clothing that protects the head, body, and extremities, and consists of at least the following components: foot and leg protection, hand protection, body protection, eye, face and head protection.

Departments also need to develop an effective accountability system to adequately account for personnel at the scene.

Other potential standards relating to your department that could apply depending on those functions that your members are expected to perform may include, but are not limited to:

Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.120

Respiratory Protection - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.134

Permit Required Confined Spaces - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.146

Lockout/Tagout - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.147

Bloodborne Pathogens - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office30

Hazard Communication - 19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.1200

Should you have any questions, or would like to schedule a free consultation, call CONN-OSHA at (860) 566-4550.

THE MOST COMMONLY CITED NATIONAL & STATE OSHA STANDARDS:

THE TOP 20

Tom Retano, Construction Safety Consultant

The following citation statistics are available and were obtained from www.osha.gov for Federal OSHA and Connecticut OSHA (CONN-OSHA) from October, 2000 through September, 2001. A search was done for all Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes for 1-249 employees. For each set of results listed below, the standard number, total number of citations per standard, total dollar penalties per standard, and standard description are presented.

For workplaces in the United States covered by Federal OSHA, there were a total of 23,562 inspections in which one or more citations were issued. There were 97,467 citations issued as a result of these inspections. Within the top twenty, seven were related to construction.

Most Frequently Cited Standards: Federal OSHA

Standard

#Cited

$Penalty*

Description

1926.451

7622

6,816,480.01

General Requirements for all types of Scaffolding

19.1200

6931

1,045,852.90

Hazard Communication

1926.501

4659

6,597,616.08

Fall Protection Scope/Application/Definitions

19.134

3771

1,052,428.56

Respiratory Protection

19.147

3461

3,848,465.56

The Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout

19.305

2846

851,735.19

Electrical, Wiring Methods, Components & Equipment

19.212

2434

2,750,274.48

Machines, General Requirements

19.178

2161

1,475,7.80

Powered Industrial Trucks

19.219

2011

1,257,323.06

Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus

19.303

1962

902,704.86

Electrical Systems Design, General Requirements

1926.651

1832

2,303,177.35

Excavations, General Requirements

19.132

1730

1,5,563.71

Personal Protective Equipment, General Requirements

1930

1716

695,778.67

Bloodborne Pathogens

1926.53

1604

830,667.68

Ladders

19.217

1492

923,955.65

Mechanical Power Presses

1926.0

1431

805,432.53

Head Protection

1904.2

1411

801,491.58

Log & Summary of Occupational Injuries & Illnesses

1926.20

1376

1,084,642.17

Construction, General Safety & Health Provisions

19.157

1368

307,414.49

Portable Fire Extinguishers

1926.405

1352

417,542.25

Electrical Wiring Methods, Components & Equipment, General Use

*Penalties shown reflect current rather than initial amounts.

Most Frequently Cited Standards: CONN- OSHA

Standard

#Cited

$Penalty*

Description

19.1200

46

1159.00

Hazard Communication

19.134

33

502.00

Respiratory Protection

19.305

32

0.00

Electrical, Wiring Methods, Components & Equipment

19.303

31

2.00

Electrical Systems Design, General Requirements

19.30

28

500.00

Bloodborne Pathogens

19.157

25

2.00

Portable Fire Extinguishers

19.22

18

84.00

Walking-Working Surfaces, General Requirements

19.269

15

0.00

Electric Power Generation/Transmission/Distribution

19.6

13

688.00

Flammable & Combustible Liquids

19.01

12

340.00

Asbestos Tremolite, Anthophyillite & Actinolite

19..23

11

730.00

Guarding Floor & Wall Openings & Holes

19..212

11

700.00

Machines, General Requirements

31-374

 

0.00

Injury/Illness Recordkeeping Requirements

19..147

 

252.00

The Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout

19.37

9

0.00

Means of Egress, General

19.156

9

112.00

Fire Brigades

19.304

8

412.00

Electrical, Wiring Design & Protection

19.244

7

0.00

Other Portable Tools & Equipment

19.132

6

770.00

Personal Protective Equipment, General Requirements

19.213

6

344.00

Woodworking Machinery Requirements

19.215

6

208.00

Abrasive Wheel Machinery

*Penalties shown reflect current rather than initial amounts.

If your workplace has hazards related to these most frequently cited OSHA standards, it may be good advice to review lost time injuries/illnesses and operations to help improve your organizationís safety and health program, and possibly the bottom line.

CONN-OSHA TRAINING UPDATE

The following training sessions will be offered by CONN-OSHA in the upcoming months. We require preregistration for all workshops because of limited classroom size. All sessions are FREE and will be held at the State of Connecticut, Department of Labor, Staff Development Conference Room "A," 200 Folly Brook Boulevard, Wethersfield, Connecticut. Once we receive your registration request, we will send a confirmation letter to you with directions included. There are three convenient ways to register:

  • By mail:
    Mr. John Able
    Connecticut Department of Labor, OSHA Division
    38 Wolcott Hill Road
    Wethersfield, CT 06109
  • Fax: (860) 566-6916
  • E-mail: John.Able@osha.gov

Schedule:

July 16, 2002, 9 am - 12 noon

Work Zone Safety for Maintenance Operations on Local Roads

In this workshop, participants will learn how to manage work zone traffic, set up and maintain safe work zones, install and monitor traffic control devices, and identify and train the right people for flagging in the work zone.

September 26, 2002, 9 am - 12 noon

Lockout/Tagout

Covers the basic requirements of 29CFR19Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office.147, the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) standard. The workshop discusses sources of hazardous energy and covers energy control procedural requirements including inspections, training and communication.

October 3, 2002, 9 am - 12 noon

Recordkeeping, the new OSHA Form 300

Introduces participants to the new Recordkeeping standard and requirements. If you are responsible for filling out the Log and Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, if you supervise the person that completes the form, or if you are a safety committee member, this class is a must!

CONN-OSHA Quarterly Index

Last Updated: October 24, 2016


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