Connecticut Department of Labor
  Home About Us FAQ News and Notices Contact Us
Report a Fatality or Catastrophe Consultation Services Training and Calendar of Events Directions/Office Information

 

CONN-OSHA Report Finds Injuries and Illnesses For Public Sector Workers Is At Record Low

 

RELEASE: Immediate

WETHERSFIELD, Dec. 27 - An annual survey of occupational injuries and illnesses compiled by the Department of Labor’s CONN-OSHA division shows a total of 99,300 injuries and illnesses were reported in Connecticut public and private sector workplaces during 1999. That translates into a rate of 7.2 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers, Commissioner James P. Butler reported today.  Public sector injury and illness rates, he pointed out, dropped to the lowest level since data was first collected in 1975.

The survey shows a 2.4% increase in the number of cases since last year, a fact offset by a 1% increase in hours worked in 1999. That amounts to an increase in the incidence rate from 7.1 in 1998 back to the 1997 level of 7.2.

“The overall Connecticut incidence rate of reported injuries and illnesses rose from the all-time low level of 7.1 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 full-time workers in 1998 to 7.2 cases in 1999 (Table 1),” explains Joseph Weber, CONN-OSHA Research Analyst Supervisor, who helped prepare the report.  “The private sector rate of 6.8 is also an increase from the all-time low rate of 6.6 set in 1998.  After three consecutive years with an incidence rate of 9.0, the private sector rate in Connecticut dropped to 8.5 in 1994, 8.0 in 1995, 7.4 in 1996 and 6.6 for 1997 and 1998 before rising in 1999 (Table 6).”

Connecticut Public Sector – The incidence rate for Connecticut’s state and local government employees, Weber said, declined again in 1999.  The rate dropped from 11.9 in 1998 to a level of 11.2 for 1999, setting another record low level for the public sector.  The decrease was seen in both the state government and the local government divisions, with both experiencing the lowest injury and illness rates since public sector data was first collected in 1975. State government dropped from 8.7 in 1998 to a new record low 7.9 in 1999, while local government did likewise over the year, decreasing from 13.7 to 13.1.  The lost workday incidence rate in the public sector also established a new low level.  Since the survey’s all-time high level in 1989 of 8.6, the rate of lost workday cases has dropped steadily to its current record low of 4.4.

National Rates and Totals – The national rate of occupational injuries and illnesses in the private sector declined for the seventh year in a row to an all-time low in 1999. A total of 5.7 million injuries and illnesses were reported in private industry workplaces last year, a rate of 6.3 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.  Employers reported a 4% drop in the number of cases and a 2% increase in hours worked as compared with 1998, Weber said. That reduced the case rate from 6.7 in 1998 to 6.3 in 1999.  Every major industry division experienced a decline in the workplace injury and illness rates over the year, except for transportation and public utilities which was unchanged from 1998.

Industry Comparisons –  To account for differences in industry employment and hours worked, the Bureau of Labor Statistics calculates incidence rates relating the number of injuries and/or illnesses to employee hours in the workplace (See Footnote 1, Table 1). The 1999 injury and illness rates ranged from 11.2 in state and local government, to 1.8 in finance, insurance and real estate.  Normally, fluctuations occur within the Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office major industry divisions in the state whether or not there is an increase or decrease in the overall incidence rate of work-related injuries and illnesses.  In 1999, four major industry divisions reported decreases in their injury and illness rates – agriculture, mining, manufacturing and government.  Five industry divisions reported increases – construction, transportation and public utilities, wholesale trade, retail trade and services.  The remaining division – finance insurance and real estate - was unchanged from its 1998 rate (Table 5).

Highest Rate Industries - An examination of the industries with the ten highest rates of occupational injury and illness shows that the public sector continues to be the most hazardous (Table 1).  Local government contributed four of the top five industries: justice, public order and safety (28.1), public works – street & highway (27.8), public utilities (23.2) and parks and recreation (17.6).  The fourth highest industry was private sector air transportation (18.8).  These were followed by local and interurban passenger transit (16.2), primary metal industries (13.5) and trucking and warehousing (13.1).  State government social services (12.9) and amusement and recreation services (12.9) round out the top-ten list.

Lost Workday Cases  - Slightly under half of the 99,300 cases in 1999 (48,200) were lost workday cases. That is, they required recuperation away from work or restricted duties at work, or both (Table 2).  The incidence rate for lost workday cases has declined steadily since 1989 in Connecticut’s public sector (from 8.6 to 4.4). In the private sector it remains at the 1998 level, which moved up to 3.4 after five years of decline (Table 6).

Injuries - Of the 99,300 nonfatal injuries and illnesses in 1999, 93,800 (94%) were injuries that resulted in either lost worktime, medical treatment other than first aid, loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion, or transfer to another job.  Injury rates are generally higher for mid-sized establishments employing 50 to 249 workers than for smaller or larger establishments. However, this pattern does not hold within certain industry divisions (Table 3).

Illnesses - There were about 5,500 newly reported cases of occupational illnesses in Connecticut in 1999, just under 6% of the total number of injuries and illnesses reported statewide.  Over 40% of the reported occupational illnesses, 2,300 cases, were in the manufacturing division (Table 4).

About the Survey

The Connecticut Department of Labor (DOL), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), has just completed the seventh year of a redesigned survey of occupational injuries and illnesses.  DOL, using additional information collected for 1998, has already released details on who sustained workplace injuries and illnesses and how they occurred.  Data from 1999 is due to be released next spring.  Summary statistics comparable to those provided in previous years will continue to be reported.  The revised survey enables DOL to provide case characteristics, demographic data and injury and illness profiles that will allow analysis of such variables as the age, sex and occupation of the injured worker as well as the nature, body part affected, and type and source of the injury or illness.  The goal is to better recognize and abate work hazards.

The Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses is a federal-state program in which employer reports are collected and processed by the Connecticut DOL in cooperation with BLS.  Approximately 4,500 establishments representing private industry (except for mines and railroads) and state and local government were sampled for 1999.
The survey excludes the self employed, farmers with fewer than 11 employees, private households, and employees in federal government agencies.  Under a separate system, agencies of the federal government file work injury and illness reports with the U.S. Labor Secretary.

Occupational injuries and illnesses for coal, metal and nonmetal mining and railroad activities were provided to BLS by the U.S. DOL Mine Safety and Health Administration and the Federal Railroad Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The annual survey estimates of occupational injuries and illnesses are based on a scientifically selected sample, rather than a census of the entire population.  Results for sample-based estimates may differ from the results obtained from a population census.  The sample used was one of many possible samples, each of which could have produced different estimates.  The variation in the sample estimates across all possible samples that could have been drawn is measured by the standard error.  This can be used to calculate a “confidence interval” around the sample estimate.  Details are available from the state DOL Occupational Safety and Health Statistics Unit.

The data also is subject to non-sampling error such as inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, mistakes in recording or coding the data and difficulties in agreeing on definitions.

Contact: Paul Oates  (860) 263-6535


1999 Summary Data Tables

IMPORTANT  NOTE: Some of the following tables were created in PDF format.  Adobe Acrobat Reader software is needed to view and print these documents.  If you do not currently have this software installed on your computer, you may download it from the PDF Help page.

  • Table 1: Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and selected case types, 1999  
  • Table 2: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and selected case types, 1999  
  • Table 3: Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries by industry division and employment size, 1999  
  • Table 4: Number of nonfatal occupational illnesses by industry division and selected case types, 1999  
  • Table 5: Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry division and selected case types, 1996-1999
  • Table 6: Occupational injury and illness incidence rates per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 full-time workers, (1) 1976-99 (2)

1999 Summary Charts

  • Chart 1: Incidence rates per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 full-time workers for total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry division,
  • Connecticut, 1998 & 1999  (PDF, 6KB)
  • Chart 2: Percent distribution of occupational illnesses by category of illness, Connecticut, all industries, 1999  (PDF, 5KB)
  • Chart 3: Major industry groups with the highest nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 full-time employees for total cases, Connecticut, 1999  (PDF, 6KB)
1999 Case and Demographic Data Tables

Private Industry

  • Table 1: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 2: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 3: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker occupations and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 4: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 5: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 6: Incidence rates for nonfatal injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office,000 full-time workers for selected characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, private industry 
  • Table 7: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 8: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected occupations and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 9: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
  • Table 10: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry division and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, private industry  
State Government
  • Table 1: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 2: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 3: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker occupations and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 4: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 5: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 6: Incidence rates for nonfatal injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office,000 full-time workers for selected characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 7: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 8: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected occupations and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 9: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
  • Table 10: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry division and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, state government  
Local Government
  • Table 1: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 11KB)
  • Table 2: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 11KB)
  • Table 3: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker occupations and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 11KB)
  • Table 4: Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 15KB)
  • Table 5: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury and illness characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 16KB)
  • Table 6: Incidence rates for nonfatal injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office,000 full-time workers for selected characteristics and industry division, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 16KB)
  • Table 7: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management OfficeKB)
  • Table 8: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected occupations and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 11KB)
  • Table 9: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 15KB)
  • Table 10: Percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry division and number of days away from work, 1999, Connecticut, local government  (PDF, 7KB)

Safety and Health Statistics

Last Updated: October 24, 2016


200 Folly Brook Boulevard, Wethersfield, CT 06109 / Phone: 860-263-6000

Home | CT.gov Home Send Feedback
State of Connecticut Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. Copyright 2002 - present year