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CONN-OSHA Annual Survey Shows 72,300 Injuries and Illnesses in Connecticut Workplaces During 2003

A total of 72,300 injuries and illnesses were reported in Connecticut’s public and private sector workplaces during 2003, according to the Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses compiled by the Department of Labor’s CONN-OSHA division. The total translates into a rate of 5.5 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers. The rate of injuries and illnesses declined from 5.7 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers in 2002.  The decline is a result of a 5.6 percent decline in the number of cases reported and a 2.1 percent decrease in the number of hours worked. 

The private sector rate decreased from 5.4 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent workers in 2002 to 5.1 in 2003.  The public sector – state government and local municipal government operations – also declined in 2003 to a rate of 8.6, down from 8.8 in 2002. 

Revisions to the Survey

Change in industry classifications: Beginning with the 2003 reference year, the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses began using the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).  Prior to 2003, the survey used the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. The substantial differences between these systems result in breaks in series for industry data.  Users are advised against making comparisons between the 2003 industry categories and the results from previous years.  The only comparisons possible are those at the sector totals mentioned above, comparing the 2003 data with 2002 for private sector, public sector and all industry levels. 

Connecticut Public Sector

The incidence rate for Connecticut’s state and local government employees was measured at 8.6 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers in 2003, down from the rate of 8.8 registered in 2002. Local municipal government operations declined from a rate of 8.9 in 2002 to 8.7 in 2003 while state government decreased from 8.8 to 8.3 over the same time period.  The rate of total recordable cases in the public sector is significantly higher than the private sector rate of 5.1 primarily due to hazardous occupations unique to the public sector such as police officers and firefighters. Overall, the public sector contributed 13,700 of Connecticut’s 72,300 work-related injuries and illnesses (19%) while providing 13% of the employment. 

National Rates and Totals

A total of 4.4 million nonfatal injuries and illnesses were reported in private industry workplaces during 2003, resulting in a rate of 5.0 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.  The rate of injuries and illnesses declined from 5.3 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers in 2002.  Approximately 2.3 million injuries and illnesses were cases with days away from work, job transfer or restriction; that is, they required recuperation away from work, transfer to another job, restricted duties at work, or a combination of these actions.  The remaining 2.1 million injuries and illnesses were other recordable cases that did not result in time away from work. The incidence rate for cases with days away from work, job transfer or restriction was 2.6 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 workers, and the rate for other recordable cases was 2.4. 

Industry Comparisons

To account for differences in industry employment and hours worked, the Bureau of Labor Statistics calculates incidence rates relating the number of injuries and/or illnesses to employee

hours in the workplace. This can be found in footnote 1, table 1. Every employer is categorized in one of 20 industry sectors which make up the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The 2003 injury and illness rates ranged from 8.6 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers in State and local government, to 0.9 in Finance and insurance.  

Highest Rate Industries (Table 1)

An examination of the industries with the Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office highest rates of occupational injury and illness shows that the public sector continues to be the most hazardous. The public sector had six of the Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office highest rates with local government contributing the top three industries: waste management and remediation services (34.0 cases per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 equivalent full-time workers); public works – street & highway (25.5); and justice, public order and safety activities (20.9). These industries were followed by private sector warehousing and storage (17.4), couriers and messengers (16.6), nursing and residential care facilities (16.3), and primary metal manufacturing (14.8).  State government health care and social assistance (14.1), local government water, sewerage and other systems (13.9) and local government parks and recreation (13.6) round out the top-ten list. 

“DART” Cases (Table 2) 

More than half of the 72,300 cases in 2003 (40,200) were cases involving days away from work, restriction or job transfer. These cases required recuperation away from work, transfer to another job, restricted duties at work, or a combination of these actions. Of these cases, the majority (25,200) involved days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction while the remainder (14,900 cases) involved transfer or restriction only. 

Injuries (Table 3)

Of the 72,300 nonfatal injuries and illnesses in 2003, 67,800 (94%) were injuries that resulted in either lost worktime, medical treatment other than first aid, loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion, or transfer to another job. Injury rates are generally higher for mid-sized establishments employing 50 to 249 workers than for smaller or larger establishments. However, this pattern does not hold within certain industry divisions. 

Illnesses (Table 4)

There were about 4,600 newly reported cases of occupational illnesses in Connecticut in 2003, just over 6% of the total number of injuries and illnesses reported statewide. Approximately 30% of the reported occupational illnesses (1,400 cases) were in the manufacturing sector. 

Survey Notes 

The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses is a Federal/State program in which employer reports were collected from about 183,700 private industry establishments nationwide in 2003 and processed by State agencies cooperating with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The Connecticut DOL sampled approximately 4,500 establishments in the private and public sectors. The survey measures nonfatal injuries and illnesses only. The survey excludes the self-employed; farms with fewer than 11 employees; private households; Federal government agencies; and, for national estimates, employees in State and local government agencies. The annual survey provides estimates of the number and frequency (incidence rates) of workplace injuries and illnesses based on logs kept by private and public sector employers during the year. These records reflect not only the year’s injury and illness experience, but also the employers’ understanding of which cases are work related under recordkeeping rules revised by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor and made effective on January 1, 2002.  

Data in this release mark the first time for the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses that establishments are classified by industry based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System Manual, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget. NAICS recognizes hundreds of new businesses in the United States economy, most of which are in the service providing sector. NAICS classifies establishments into a detailed industry based on the production processes and provided services. As a result of the conversion to NAICS, the estimates by industry from the 2003 survey are not comparable with those from prior years. 

Occupational injury and illness data for coal, metal, and nonmetal mining and for railroad activities were provided by the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the Department of Transportation’s Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), respectively. Neither of these agencies adopted the revised OSHA recordkeeping requirements for 2003. Therefore, estimates for these industries for 2003 are not comparable with estimates for other industries. 

The survey estimates of occupational injuries and illnesses are based on a scientifically selected probability sample, rather than a census of the entire population. Because the data are based on a sample survey, the injury and illness estimates probably differ from the figures that would be obtained from all units covered by the survey. To determine the precision of each estimate, a standard error was calculated. The standard error defines a range (confidence interval) around the estimate. The approximate 95-percent confidence interval is the estimate plus or minus twice the standard error. The standard error also can be expressed as a percent of the estimate, or the relative standard error. For example, the national 2003 incidence rate for all occupational injuries  and illnesses of 5.0 per Published by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Project Management Office0 full-time workers in private industry has an estimated relative standard error of about 0.6 percent.  The 95-percent confidence interval would be 5.0 plus or minus 1.2 percent (2 times 0.6 percent) or 4.94 to 5.06.  One can be 95% confident that the “true” incidence rate falls within the confidence interval. A relative standard error was calculated for each estimate from the survey and will be available on the BLS Internet site at http://www.bls.gov/iif/home.htm

The number of injuries and illnesses reported in any year can be influenced by the level of economic activity, working conditions and work practices, worker experience and training, and the number of hours worked.  The data also are subject to nonsampling error. The inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, mistakes in recording or coding the data, and definition difficulties are examples of nonsampling error in the survey. Nonsampling errors are not measured. However, BLS has implemented quality assurance procedures to minimize nonsampling error in the survey.

2003 Summary Data Tables

2003 Case and Demographic Data Tables

Safety and Health Statistics

Last Updated: October 24, 2016


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